Fairmount InSights
Don Kligerman

Every January, the same scene: the gym locker room crowded with determined New Year’s Resolutioners. While not unwelcome, us long-termers know that 90% will be gone by March. What separates the 10% from the rest of the pack?

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One of the most tired pieces of advice around nonprofits (as well as your personal career) is network, network, network!

This isn’t to say that networking and collaboration aren’t vitally important to an organization’s success – I’d wager it’s quite the opposite. In a world of finite human and financial resources and seemingly infinite need, successful nonprofits are connected to and learning from other great organizations. These nonprofits are also filled with well-connected individuals. MORE

Adela Smith

We’ve written recently about the relationship between failure, big ideas, and success. Seth Godin has a great post today about nonprofits’ social mandate to innovate to solve big problems. Guess who shows up?

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Last week I wrote about football and the value of punting. This week, I’m moving to baseball and considering another question: How can we determine what the most useful data is for evaluating performance? MORE

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“Good judgment is the result of experience and experience the result of bad judgment.”—Mark Twain

While it’s easy to pat yourself on the back for a job well done, examining organizational mistakes, struggles, and shortcomings can be unpleasant, but it’s the key to future success. MORE

Aimée Miller

I’ve been thinking about anchors. No, not the seafaring kind, though I do enjoy a legitimate opportunity to wear Topsiders now and again. I’m focused on community anchors – go-to neighborhood organizations – and how they’re evolving to address deeply-entrenched challenges of poverty and blight. MORE

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The most successful nonprofit leaders have a relentless dedication to not only serve, but to empower their constituents. They strive to offer assistance that develops self-reliance. And they understand that success often means their organization will fundamentally change, or even run itself out of business.
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